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quickpickle

I cannot adequately express to you how many tomatoes we had from our garden this year nor the emotions those tomatoes brought forth. When I noticed there were too many tomato plants growing what did I do? I allowed them all to grow. When I noticed that I’d have 1,000,000,005 tomatoes this year what did I do? I picked every single one. I hate wasting when I grow. So that has left me in somewhat of a panic trying to figure out what to do with all of the tomatoes.

I experienced some wonderful picked vegetables at my CSA’s Chef-in-the-Box demonstration. I immediately thought it’d be a good way to use some of my tomatoes but immediately forgot the quick pickle process right after I asked. Oops.

After some searching online I found a few ideas and modified a few things. I had to remove the sugar and increase amounts as I’m dealing with large volumes of tomatoes here. Seriously.

So here it is… a super simple and quick pickle recipe for tiny tomatoes. It’s easy, yummy, versatiles, and has a bit of a kick!

You’ll need:
1 1/2 c raw apple cider vinegar
1 1/2 c water
8 tsp coarse kosher salt
1 tbsp maple syrup
1 tsp lemon juice
24 oz small tomatoes (cherry, pear, or grape)
1/4 c fresh chopped dill
4 medium thinly sliced garlic cloves
1/2 tsp crushed red pepper flakes

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Wash the tomatoes and remove the stems.

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Combine apple cider vinegar, water, kosher salt, maple syrup, and lemon juice and heat until salt is dissolved. Set aside and let cool for 25 minutes.

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Cut the tomatoes in half and put in a large bowl.

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Add the dill, garlic, red pepper flakes and mix.

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Put the mixture into whatever container you plan to use. This recipe fits perfectly into three mason jars.

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Cover the tomatoes with the cider vinegar mixture and let sit open for a few hours.

Refrigerate for up to three weeks and use however you wish!

Some suggestions for use:
As a side
On top of a salad
On chips or crackers, along with sour cream (would be a great hors d’oeuvre or snack for guests)
Give as a hostess gift

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I’ve been meaning to make granola for months and months and months. I’ve seen many more granola recipes pinned on Pinterest lately – I assume partly due to the cooler weather and a desire for us to use our ovens and due to an increase in anything that can be made with pumpkin.

pumpkingranola

This was easy, pumpkiny, and yummy.

What you’ll need:
2 cups rolled oats
1/4 cup uncooked quinoa
1/4 cup flaxseed meal
1/2 cup chopped pecans (or chopped not of your choice)
1/2 cup raisins (or dried berry of your choice)
1/4 cup maple syrup (or raw honey)
1/4 cup (heaping) pumpkin puree
1/2 tsp vanilla extract
pinch or more of:
nutmeg
cinnamon
allspice
cloves
sea salt

Preheat your oven to 325 F.

Line a baking sheet with parchment paper (because that makes making almost everything a million times easier), spread out the oats and the quinoa and toast for 10-15 minutes, stirring it every 5 minutes or so.

In a blow combine the flaxseed, pecans, and raisins. When the oats and quinoa are finished add them to the bowl and toss. Reduce the oven to 300 F.

In a smaller bowl combine the maple syrup, pumpkin, vanilla, and spices. Mix this together and pour it over the dry mixture.

Spread this over the same parchment paper lined baking sheet (because wasting parchment paper is silly) and cook for 35 minutes.

See how simple that is? :)

Have you made your own granola? I can’t believe I’m only just doing it now. Olive really likes it, which is great seeing as there are so many good things crammed in there (oat, quinoa, flax, oh my!).

Welcome to the second installment of Forty Chore Friday. I wonder if anyone will join me in this. I guess I kind of doubt it because 40 chores are kind of a lot. And it’s Friday. But maybe someone else will understand my reasoning and find that they feel the same. :)

Here is my list:

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I failed at grocery shopping earlier in this week and have to do it today, unfortunately. So I got a head start on a few of these things yesterday when I realized my problem. Stopping at the Farmer’s Market AND the Co-op usually knocks out the entire first part of our day.

Here are the results of today’s Forty Chore Friday:

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I have to finish moving the boxes that were on the stairs. I may steam mop tonight after Olive goes to bed and while Honey is outside. I didn’t print the CSA photos but I might do that later. And I didn’t mark the hallway shelves for cutting.

I started with 40 things. I didn’t do 4 things. I added 7 things. I might do 3/4 of the things left.

So today was 43-46 Chore Friday. :)

Have you noticed a lot of people doing twenty chore Tuesday posts? On their blogs and on Instagram? Or mentioning it on twitter?

Tuesdays don’t work for me. I typically go grocery shopping on Tuesdays which cuts out about half the day.

Fridays work much better for me. Why? Maybe you’ve noticed this phenomenon as well. Stay at home parents seem to have a difficult time on the weekends when the other parent is home. Maybe that sounds weird, and I don’t mean it in an offensive way, but things get thrown off. You relax (or try to). Children act differently. There are more dirty dishes, more things to put away. And an addition human being, and ADULT human being, to interact with.

Starting today I’m doing forty chore Friday. Because forty is way better than twenty. And also because its kind of my finial push to prepare for the weekend. Get things extra organized, prepare for an activities we may be doing, whatever. Just get ready for the different than is the weekend.

Here is my list:

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Let me know if you would like to participate too!

And don’t forget.. No one will die if you don’t cross everything off of your list. ;)

Oh hi. I’ve been busy. :)

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I can’t remember what I’ve made with this. Lots of things. The kale is often used in Dal. The corn is often cooked in the oven along with some small potatoes and chicken sausage. Everything else is pretty varied.

Our garden is giving us entirely too many zucchini and cucumbers. Both of which you see we aslo get from our CSA share. The zucchini is used in place of pasta for simple dishes and lasagna, as well as in fajitas and for brownies. Lately I’ve been juicing cucumbers and drinking the juice as well as making popsicles with it. But the popsicles are tiny. I need more molds to keep up! Our garden has recently started giving us ripe tomatoes. A million, to be exact. I’m borrowing a dehydrator and hoping to do something useful with some tomatoes and zucchini.

Our jungle of a garden:

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A giant zucchini:

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Olive, quite seriously, enjoying her first corn on the cob:

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This week’s share includes carrots, onions, beets, basil, green peppers, sweet corn, eggplant, and cabbage.  I was lucky enough to get more carrots and eggplant, as well as okra, kale, and a bouquet of flowers as extras!

In other vegetable news I finally figured out what the mystery squash growing in our garden is.

Drum roll…..

Peter Pan Pattypan!

And guess what?  It’s one of many mystery vegetables growing in our garden from last year’s compost.  Including tomatoes, potatoes, onions, and this squash!

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Also I have to apologize for falling through in the what did I make with last week’s share portion of my CSA post.  I was thrown off one week when we had family in town and am now occasionally left with produce from the previous week’s share when I write the new post so it just seemed too difficult to continue.

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